• Journal of critical care · Oct 2019

    Review

    Efficacy of music on sedation, analgesia and delirium in critically ill patients. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    There is inadequate evidence supporting the benefit of music on sedation, analgesia or delirium in critically ill patients.

    pearl
    • Garcia Guerra Gonzalo G Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada; Stollery Children's Hospital, Edmonton, AB, Canada., Luiz Almeida, Liliane Zorzela, Susanne King-Jones, Ari R Joffe, Lisa Hartling, Hsing Jou, Sunita Vohra, and Canadian Critical Care Trials Group.
    • Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada; Stollery Children's Hospital, Edmonton, AB, Canada.
    • J Crit Care. 2019 Oct 1; 53: 75-80.

    PurposeTo systematically synthesize randomized controlled trial data on the efficacy of music to provide sedation and analgesia, and reduce incidence of delirium, in critically ill patients.Material And MethodsRelevant databases (Medline, PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, Cochrane, Alt Healthwatch, LILACS, PsycINFO, CAIRSS, RILM) were searched from inception to April 26, 2018. We also searched the reference lists of included publications and for ongoing trials. The selection of relevant articles was conducted by two researchers at two levels of screening. Data collection followed the recommendations from the Cochrane Systematic Reviews Handbook. We used the Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias. Quality of the evidence was rated according to GRADE.ResultsThe review identified six adult studies and no neonatal or pediatric studies. A descriptive analysis of study results was performed. Meta-analysis was not feasible due to heterogeneity. One study reported a reduction in sedation requirements with the use of music while the other five did not find any significant differences across groups.ConclusionsThis systematic review revealed limited evidence to support or refute the use of music to reduce sedation/analgesia requirements, or to reduce delirium in critically ill adults, and no evidence in pediatric and neonatal critically ill patients.Copyright © 2019. Published by Elsevier Inc.

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    There is inadequate evidence supporting the benefit of music on sedation, analgesia or delirium in critically ill patients.

    Daniel Jolley  Daniel Jolley
     
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