• Br J Anaesth · Sep 2019

    Severe acute pain and persistent post-surgical pain in orthopaedic trauma patients: a cohort study.

    Severe acute pain in orthopaedic trauma patients is more common among female patients and those having had previous injury-related surgery, and preoperative pain severity is associated with persistent pain at 3 months.

    pearl
    • Carla Edgley, Malcolm Hogg, Anurika De Silva, Sabine Braat, Andrew Bucknill, and Kate Leslie.
    • Department of Anaesthesia and Pain Management and Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, Australia; Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    • Br J Anaesth. 2019 Sep 1; 123 (3): 350-359.

    BackgroundWe conducted a cohort study of adult patients presenting for orthopaedic trauma surgery at a statewide trauma centre, with the aims of determining (i) the incidence and risk factors for severe acute pain in the PACU, and (ii) the incidence and risk factors for persistent post-surgical pain at 3 months.MethodsData were collected before operation, in the PACU, 72 h after surgery and 3 months after surgery, and included numerical rating scale (NRS) scores for pain, and modified Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form, Kessler Psychological Distress Scale, World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule, and Pain Catastrophizing Scale scores.ResultsSevere acute pain in the PACU was reported by 171 (56%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 51%, 62%) of the 303 included patients. Female sex (odds ratio [OR]: 1.86; 95% CI: 1.06, 3.26) and prior post-injury surgery (OR: 2.21; 95% CI: 1.11, 4.41) remained associated with severe acute pain after multivariable adjustment. Persistent post-surgical pain at 3 months was reported by 149 (65%; 95% CI: 59%, 71%) of the 229 included patients. The preoperative NRS score (OR: 1.17; 95% CI: 1.03, 1.32) remained associated with persistent pain after multivariable adjustment.ConclusionsWe identified three easy-to-measure risk factors: female sex, prior post-injury surgery for severe acute pain, and preoperative NRS scores for persistent pain. Further research is required to identify pain management strategies and psychosocial interventions to reduce the burden of pain, disability, and distress in these patients.Copyright © 2019 British Journal of Anaesthesia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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    pearl
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    Severe acute pain in orthopaedic trauma patients is more common among female patients and those having had previous injury-related surgery, and preoperative pain severity is associated with persistent pain at 3 months.

    Daniel Jolley  Daniel Jolley
     
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