• Br J Sports Med · Aug 2020

    Review

    Is running associated with a lower risk of all-cause, cardiovascular and cancer mortality, and is the more the better? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Running for as little as 50 min/week reduces all-cause (27%), cardiovascular (30%) and cancer (23%) mortality.

    pearl
    • Zeljko Pedisic, Nipun Shrestha, Stephanie Kovalchik, Emmanuel Stamatakis, Nucharapon Liangruenrom, Jozo Grgic, Sylvia Titze, Stuart Jh Biddle, Adrian E Bauman, and Pekka Oja.
    • Institute for Health and Sport, Victoria University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia Zeljko.Pedisic@vu.edu.au.
    • Br J Sports Med. 2020 Aug 1; 54 (15): 898-905.

    ObjectiveTo investigate the association of running participation and the dose of running with the risk of all-cause, cardiovascular and cancer mortality.DesignSystematic review and meta-analysis.Data SourcesJournal articles, conference papers and doctoral theses indexed in Academic Search Ultimate, CINAHL, Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition, MasterFILE Complete, Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations, Open Access Theses and Dissertations, PsycINFO, PubMed/MEDLINE, Scopus, SPORTDiscus and Web of Science.Eligibility Criteria For Selecting StudiesProspective cohort studies on the association between running or jogging participation and the risk of all-cause, cardiovascular and/or cancer mortality in a non-clinical population of adults were included.ResultsFourteen studies from six prospective cohorts with a pooled sample of 232 149 participants were included. In total, 25 951 deaths were recorded during 5.5-35 year follow-ups. Our meta-analysis showed that running participation is associated with 27%, 30% and 23% lower risk of all-cause (pooled adjusted hazard ratio (HR)=0.73; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.68 to 0.79), cardiovascular (HR=0.70; 95% CI 0.49 to 0.98) and cancer (HR=0.77; 95% CI 0.68 to 0.87) mortality, respectively, compared with no running. A meta-regression analysis showed no significant dose-response trends for weekly frequency, weekly duration, pace and the total volume of running.ConclusionIncreased rates of participation in running, regardless of its dose, would probably lead to substantial improvements in population health and longevity. Any amount of running, even just once a week, is better than no running, but higher doses of running may not necessarily be associated with greater mortality benefits.© Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2020. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.

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    Running for as little as 50 min/week reduces all-cause (27%), cardiovascular (30%) and cancer (23%) mortality.

    Daniel Jolley  Daniel Jolley
     
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