• Curr Opin Anaesthesiol · Apr 2019

    Review

    The ethics of treating family members.

    An exploration of the ethics, challenges and practical reality of treating family members. Hutchison & McConnell deploy models of virtue, utilitarianism, deontology and principlism in an accessible and applied way.

    1. Virtue ethics – behaving in the way we think is right; embodying courage.
    2. Utilitarianism – behaving so as to maximise the best outcomes for the greater number of people.
    3. Deontology – obeying the rules; following a duty to moral law.
    4. Principlism – balances beneficence, nonmaleficence, autonomy and justice.

    They cautiously challenge the blanket prohibitions of many professional bodies against treating family members.

    Well worth reading.

    “Only by constantly questioning whether they are the correct person to deliver care can they hope to do right by both their relative and themselves.”

    summary
    • Colin Hutchison and Paul C McConnell.
    • Specialist Trainee in Anaesthesia, Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine.
    • Curr Opin Anaesthesiol. 2019 Apr 1; 32 (2): 169-173.

    Purpose Of ReviewMany medical professionals receive requests from family and friends asking for medical advice and treatment. But should medics treat their family? Ethically can we treat, or refuse to treat, family members? This is a common ethical challenge that most doctors face during their career and there is limited evidence available. By examining ethical principles, we aim to answer these questions and provide a framework that will guide decision making in this area.Recent FindingsThere is a paucity of evidence available. Many ethical systems exist and have been discussed since ancient Greece but in recent years, bioethics has become more prominent in medical thinking and debate.SummaryWe examine ethical systems such as virtue ethics, utilitarianism, deontology and principlism and how they relate to treating family members. We then look at cases in different contexts and describe a system for approaching such cases, allowing doctors to conform to moral standards, and consider ethical arguments, prior to embarking upon any treatment course with a relative.

      Pubmed     Full text  

      Add institutional full text...

    Notes

    summary
    1

    An exploration of the ethics, challenges and practical reality of treating family members. Hutchison & McConnell deploy models of virtue, utilitarianism, deontology and principlism in an accessible and applied way.

    1. Virtue ethics – behaving in the way we think is right; embodying courage.
    2. Utilitarianism – behaving so as to maximise the best outcomes for the greater number of people.
    3. Deontology – obeying the rules; following a duty to moral law.
    4. Principlism – balances beneficence, nonmaleficence, autonomy and justice.

    They cautiously challenge the blanket prohibitions of many professional bodies against treating family members.

    Well worth reading.

    “Only by constantly questioning whether they are the correct person to deliver care can they hope to do right by both their relative and themselves.”

    Daniel Jolley  Daniel Jolley
    comment
    0

    The ethics of treating family members – when is care ‘treating’, and when is it appropriate?

    Daniel Jolley  Daniel Jolley
     
    Do you have a pearl, summary or comment to save or share?
    250 characters remaining
    help        
    You can also include formatting, links, images and footnotes in your notes
    • Simple formatting can be added to notes, such as *italics*, _underline_ or **bold**.
    • Superscript can be denoted by <sup>text</sup> and subscript <sub>text</sub>.
    • Numbered or bulleted lists can be created using either numbered lines 1. 2. 3., hyphens - or asterisks *.
    • Links can be included with: [my link to pubmed](http://pubmed.com)
    • Images can be included with: ![alt text](https://bestmedicaljournal.com/study_graph.jpg "Image Title Text")
    • For footnotes use [^1](This is a footnote.) inline.
    • Or use an inline reference [^1] to refer to a longer footnote elseweher in the document [^1]: This is a long footnote..

    hide…